savvy.

Alexsandra. 22. Photographer. Majoring in Oceanography/Marine Bio. Pursuer of dreams. Wanderlust. Giver of no fucks.
http://alexsandrawiciel.photoshelter.com

Sometimes I chose not to answer texts because I’m busy working on making my dreams a reality. If it’s not a dire need or I don’t see a reason to respond then I’m not going to. Don’t take it so personally.

Moving

Need to get all the stuff out of my house and down the street by Friday. Fuck.

alexsandrawiciel:

That’s what girls dreams are made of - you either have it or you don’t
Taking Back Sunday - Portland Maine 
alexsandrawiciel.photoshelter.com

alexsandrawiciel:

That’s what girls dreams are made of - you either have it or you don’t

Taking Back Sunday - Portland Maine 

alexsandrawiciel.photoshelter.com

bostonflavor asked: In Boston at House of Blues!

Oh nice I was at the Portland Maine show

Perfect day :)

Perfect day :)

bostonflavor asked: How'd your TBS/The Used shoot go?? I was so nervous going in because I heard they were both hard to shoot, but I loved my shots!

Yeah mine came out great! Where did you shoot them?

There’s this huge smile plastered on my face as I head to Portland to photograph one of my favorite bands that I listened to in high school. I can’t tell you how amazing it is to feel you dreams coming true, you life falling into place, and having the best supportive and kindest friends who encourage you along the journey (you know who you are) 

I’m so thankful tonight.

There’s this huge smile plastered on my face as I head to Portland to photograph one of my favorite bands that I listened to in high school. I can’t tell you how amazing it is to feel you dreams coming true, you life falling into place, and having the best supportive and kindest friends who encourage you along the journey (you know who you are)

I’m so thankful tonight.

It’s the little things :)

It’s the little things :)

😂 😭😂 😭😂 😭 dying.

😂 😭😂 😭😂 😭 dying.

Basket star fish! So cool!

Basket star fish! So cool!

Seeing all this in my inbox makes me giddy

Seeing all this in my inbox makes me giddy

Cell phones generate electromagnetic fields (EMF), and emit electromagnetic radiation (EMR). They share this feature with all modern electronics that run on alternating current (AC) power (from the power grid and the outlets in your walls) or that utilize wireless communication. Different devices radiate different levels of EMF, with different characteristics. …

The many potential negative health effects from EMF exposure (including many cancers and Alzheimer’s disease) can take decades to develop. So we won’t know the results of this experiment for many years—possibly decades. But by then, it may be too late for billions of people. …the entire power grid is an EMF-generation network that reaches almost every individual in America and 75% of the global population. Today, early in the 21st century, we find ourselves fully immersed in a soup of electromagnetic radiation on a nearly continuous basis. …

While cancer is one of the primary classes of negative health effects studied by researchers, EMF exposure has been shown to increase risk for many other types of negative health outcomes. In fact, levels of EMF thousands of times lower than current safety standards have been shown to significantly increase risk for neurodegenerative diseases (such as Alzheimer’s and Lou Gehrig’s disease) and male infertility associated with damaged sperm cells. In one study, those who lived within 50 meters of a high voltage power line were significantly more likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease when compared to those living 600 meters or more away. The increased risk was 24% after one year, 50% after 5 years, and 100% after 10 years. Other research demonstrates that using a cell phone between two and four hours a day leads to 40% lower sperm counts than found in men who do not use cell phones, and the surviving sperm cells demonstrate lower levels of motility and viability.

EMF exposure (as with many environmental pollutants) not only affects people, but all of nature. In fact, negative effects have been demonstrated across a wide variety of plant and animal life. EMF, even at very low levels, can interrupt the ability of birds and bees to navigate. Numerous studies link this effect with the phenomena of avian tower fatalities (in which birds die from collisions with power line and communications towers). These same navigational effects have been linked to colony collapse disorder (CCD), which is devastating the global population of honey bees (in one study, placement of a single active cell phone in front of a hive led to the rapid and complete demise of the entire colony). And a mystery illness affecting trees around Europe has been linked to WiFi radiation in the environment. …

[M]odern technology (the source of the humanmade electromagnetic fields discussed here) has fueled a remarkable degree of innovation, productivity, and improvement in the quality of life. If tomorrow the power grid went down, all cell phone networks would cease operation, millions of computers around the world wouldn’t turn on, and the night would be illuminated only by candlelight and the moon—we’d have a lot less EMF exposure, but at the cost of the complete collapse of modern society.

EMF isn’t just a by-product of modern society. EMF, and our ability to harness it for technological purposes, is the cornerstone of modern society. Sanitation, food production and storage, health care—these are just some of the essential social systems that rely on power and wireless communication. We have evolved a society that is fundamentally reliant upon a set of technologies that generate forms and levels of electromagnetic radiation not seen on this planet prior to the 19th century.

As a result of the central role these devices play in modern life, individuals are understandably predisposed to resist information that may challenge the safety of activities that result in EMF exposures. People simply cannot bear the thought of restricting their time with— much less giving up—these beloved gadgets. This gives industry a huge advantage because there is a large segment of the public that would rather not know.

but-a-mere-shell asked: Sorry to be blunt here but... You have a really cute butt. :)

Haha thanks!